1 Samuel: Lesson 35 — Who Do You Serve? 1 Samuel in Review

The following are the final review discussion questions from a weekly study I led through the book of 1 Samuel at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

 

Here Comes A King:
A Study of the Book of 1 Samuel

Lesson 35 (Who Do You Serve?)
1 Samuel in Review

 

  1. What stands out to you from our study of 1 Samuel?  Why?  What are some key things you have learned?  Has the study changed any of your thoughts or actions?
     
  2. Who was Samuel?   How/where did he grow up?  What is the character of the people around him as he grows up?  What happens to them?  Why?  Do/should the people around you determine how you “turn out” in life?
     
  3. As Samuel grows older, what do the people of Israel request?  What is their purpose and reasoning?  What do they expect?  How does Samuel feel about their request?  What answer does God have for Samuel’s concerns? In what ways today do people reject  God as “king” in their life? 
     
  4. How is Saul selected to be the king of Israel?  What credentials does he have?  How does he seem to take the idea of becoming king?  What are some highlights/lowlights of his life?  What are some changes that take place in him as he reigns as king?  What is behind those changes?  Do you know specific things that God has called you to do?  What qualifies you to do what God calls you to do?  Does God’s calling guarantee that you will do it correctly or faithfully?  What are some influences to changes in your life . . . For the good?  . . . For the bad?
     
  5. How does David gain national attention?  What makes him think he can do a task no one else is willing to attempt?  Where is he when it comes time to select the replacement to Saul as king?  What does he do after being anointed by Samuel to be the next king?  How confident are you of God being able to do the impossible through you?  What would it take to believe/do that?  What does it take to faithfully live day-to-day when you know God has something different in store for you?   
     
  6. How does Saul treat David?  How does that treatment change over the course of time?  What happens as Saul begins to suspect, then becomes confident, that David is to be his replacement as king?  How do you treat others?  Does that change if you perceive them to be a threat to your current position?  What protections do you need to have in place to help keep from treating people in ways that are wrong?
     
  7. How does David treat Saul?  Does that change over time?  How can you maintain a “righteous” treatment of people who don’t treat you well?  How important is honoring and respecting others to you?  How do you act toward those who are set against you?  How do you respond when your “enemies” fall?
     
  8. Who is really “king” in your life?  How can you maintain a practice of Jesus as Lord?

1 Samuel: Lesson 34 — The Mighty Have Fallen

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 1 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

 

Here Comes A King:
A Study of the Book of 1 Samuel

Lesson 34 (The Mighty Have Fallen)
1 Samuel 31:1-13; 2 Samuel 1:1-15

The Text:

  1. How does the battle go as the Philistines fight against the Israelites?  Who do the Philistines target?  How successful are they?  What condition do they leave Saul in?
     
  2. What does Saul want his armor-bearer to do?  What is Saul’s reasoning?  Does the armor-bearer do what Saul wants?  What happens?
     
  3. How does the outcome of the battle affect the rest of Israel?  What do they do?  What do the Philistines do?  What do they do with Saul?  What do the people of Jabesh Gilead do about this?
     
  4. Who comes to visit David after he returns from defeating the Amalekites?  How does he address David?  What news does he bring?  How does he tell the story of what happened? 
          
  5. What is David’s immediate response?  Who joins him in this response to the news that was given?  What does David ask of the Amalekite?  What does David have done to him?  Why?

                    

The Application:

  1. Do you ever feel like you have a target on you?  Why?  Are you a danger to the enemy?      
     
  2. Are you ever tempted to give up?  How do you persevere and remain faithful when it feels like your wounds are life-threatening?  What impact does someone else giving up have on you?  How do you think others are impacted by the way you handle your wounds?   
        
  3. Do you think the enemy would be inclined to announce your demise?  Why or why not?  How much does the honor or respect of others mean to you?  Would your risk your safety to ensure a person receives respect?  . . . Even if they don’t seem to deserve it?    
           
  4. What reasons would a stranger have for showing you honor or respect?  Do you ever try to tell about events in a way that you think the person you are telling would like to hear it?  Why?  What problems might that cause?  
     
  5. How hard is it to genuinely mourn when someone who has been against you fails?  What might make it easier?  . . . More difficult?  Is it ever right to do the wrong thing?

                     

Next week:  1 Samuel in Review

1 Samuel: Lesson 33 — Share and Share Alike

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 1 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

 

Here Comes A King:
A Study of the Book of 1 Samuel

Lesson 33 (Share and Share Alike)
1 Samuel 30:1-31

The Text:

  1. Where do David and his men go?  What is this place to them?  What has happened while they were gone?  What “good news” detail is given?
     
  2. What is the initial response of David and his men?  What do the men want to do?  How does David deal with his great distress?  Who does David go to?  For what purpose?
     
  3. What answer does David get from the priest?  What happens at the Besor Ravine?  Who is found in a field by David and his men?  Why was he there?  What does he agree to do?  What condition does he set for doing this?
     
  4. What are the Amalekites doing when David and his men catch up with them?  What does David do?  How much of what was taken is recovered?  What else is taken?   
        
  5. What do some of the men want to do when David and the men who fought the Amalekites with him rejoin the rest of the group?  How are these men described?  What is David’s response to them?  What reasoning does he give?  What else did he do with some of the plunder that was taken from the Amalekites?

                   

The Application:

  1. How do you feel when you’ve been away and finally return home?  Do you ever worry that what you leave won’t be there when you return?  Do you tend to notice, or look for, the “silver-linings in the clouds”?     
     
  2. How would you feel if your family and possessions were taken from you?  Have you ever been blamed or held responsible for someone else’s loss when you weren’t the one who took their possession?  Who do you go to when you are distressed and need answers?  
         
  3. Have you ever had to drop out of a task you began because you physically couldn’t continue?  Have you ever continued with a task when others with you had to drop out?  How does either of those situations make you feel?     
          
  4. Are you a “finisher”?  Do you stay at something until it is done or do you quit when you have what you want out of it?  
     
  5. What things keep us from being willing to share?  What role does pride have?  How is our giving a reflection of our heart?

                    

Next week: 1 Samuel 31:1-13; 2 Samuel 1:1-15
The Mighty Have Fallen

1 Samuel: Lesson 32 — Not Everyone Approves

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 1 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

 

Here Comes A King:
A Study of the Book of 1 Samuel

Lesson 32 (Not Everyone Approves)
1 Samuel 29:1-11

The Text:

  1. What are the Philistines and Israelites doing?  Where are they?  How are the Philistines described?  Where are David and his men?  What question is raised about them?
     
  2. How does Achish describe David?  Do the Philistine commanders agree with the assessment that Achish gives?  What is their concern?
     
  3. What is the reputation David has among the Philistines?  What message does Achish have to deliver to David?
     
  4. In what tone does Achish deliver his news to David?  What is his request in regard to David and the other Philistine rulers?   
     
  5. What questions does David ask of Achish?  How does Achish respond?  What do each of them do?

                  

The Application:

  1. Does it ever seem like you are constantly facing a battle of some kind?  How close is your enemy to you?  How does the size of your enemy compare to you?  When in the presence of the enemy, does anyone ever notice that you don’t fit in?     
     
  2. How do you treat those who seem to be your enemy?  Would they speak well of you?  Should they speak well of you?  What might the concerns of the Philistine commanders teach us about watching out for “wolves in sheep’s clothing” among the church?   
        
  3. Are those who are set against God concerned about the influence you may have on them?  Have you ever had to be a bearer of news that others decided but you don’t agree with?   
            
  4. Are there ways to do that graciously?  Are you a peacemaker?  What are some perceived positives and negatives of being a peacemaker?  Is it worth it?  
     
  5. Are there ways a person can “plead their case” without arguing or complaining?  What benefit do questions have over statements and complaints?  When you realize that something is beyond your control are you able to just drop it and move on?

                   

Next week: 1 Samuel 30:1-31
Share and Share Alike

1 Samuel: Lesson 31 — Bewitched

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 1 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

 

Here Comes A King:
A Study of the Book of 1 Samuel

Lesson 31 (Bewitched)
1 Samuel 28:1-25

The Text:

  1. What are the Philistines preparing to do?  What is expected of David?  How does David respond to that request?  How does Achish take the response?
     
  2. What was significant about Samuel’s death?  What good thing is mentioned that Saul had done in the past?  What is Saul’s reaction when the Philistines come and set up camp?  What does he do first?  What response does he get?
     
  3. When Saul’s initial inquiry fails, what is his next request?  What did he do with the information he received?  What interaction takes place between Saul and the woman at Endor?  What is the woman’s reaction at who she brings up?  What is Saul’s reaction?
     
  4. What is the reason Saul gives to Samuel for bringing him up?  How does Samuel respond?  Was this a new message?  What is said specifically about Saul and his sons?   
     
  5. What is Saul’s reaction to this message?  What concern does the woman have?  What does she want Saul to do?  Who joined her in making this request?  What happens?

                 

The Application:

  1. Have you ever been asked to join a group of people who are heading out to do something that you don’t like — perhaps something that is even harmful or wrong? What are some ways you could respond? Are there ways that you could go but have a different motive than everyone else?
     
  2. How serious are you about getting rid of sin, and even its temptations, from your surroundings? What do you do when you face a situation that makes you afraid and full of terror? Are there times in your life where God is silent?
     
  3. What do you do when God seems silent? Are there things that you continue to do but would deny your involvement in them if you don’t know or trust the person asking? What might that say about the action or activity?
     
  4. What are some areas where we might try to give a good reason for doing a wrong action? How often do you go to God for a different answer when you don’t like the one He’s given?
     
  5. How do you respond to God’s truth that is specific to your life? Would people be fearful of you if they were the means of delivering God’s truth into your life?

                  

Next week: 1 Samuel 29:1-11
Not Everyone Approves

1 Samuel: Lesson 30 — Hiding In Plain Sight

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 1 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

 

Here Comes A King:
A Study of the Book of 1 Samuel

Lesson 30 (Hiding In Plain Sight)
1 Samuel 27:1-12

The Text:

  1. What concern does David have about his future?  How does the “but” that begins chapter 27 tie in with the end of chapter 26? 
     
  2. Where does David decide to go?  What is his reasoning?  Who goes with David?   
     
  3. How effective was David’s plan?  What does Saul do when he hears where David has gone?
     
  4. Who was Achish?  What was David’s request of Achish?  How did Achish respond?  How long did David stay there?   
     
  5. What did David do during his time in Ziklag?  What did he tell Achish he was doing?  How did David protect the news of his actual actions?  How did Achish feel about David?

                

The Application:

  1. Are you a skeptical person?  How far do you trust someone who has continually betrayed you in the past?  Are there advantages to being a skeptic?  Disadvantages?   
     
  2. Does God have a plan for your life?  Are there times that plan inconveniences you?  Are there limits to what you would do to see that plan fulfilled?       
     
  3. How does it feel when a course of action that you take seems to work the way you had planned it?  How often do you recognize God’s hand in successful plans?  Have you ever given up on something that seemed very important to you at one time because it became too difficult?       
     
  4. How easy/difficult is it for you to ask someone for a favor?  What if that person would seem to have little reason to grant it?  What are some ways to keep from compromise when you live in enemy territory?  
     
  5. Have you ever had someone think something good about you that you knew wasn’t true?  How does it make you feel?  How about if they think bad about you that isn’t true?  How important is your reputation or character to you?  What extent would you go to in order to protect it?  Do people consider you trustworthy?  Should they?

                 

Next week: 1 Samuel 28:1-25
Bewitched

1 Samuel: Lesson 29 — Missing A Few Things

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 1 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

 

Here Comes A King:
A Study of the Book of 1 Samuel

Lesson 29 (Missing A Few Things)
1 Samuel 26:1-25

The Text:

  1. What does Saul do when word comes to him of David’s location?  Where does Saul and his chosen men camp?  How does this location compare to where David is supposed to be?
     
  2. What does David do when he sees that Saul is on the move again?  What does he find out?  When the reports come back, where does David go?  What does he take notice of?
     
  3. David asks for a volunteer from two of his men — where does he want someone to go with him to?  What does Abishai want to do?  What is David’s response?  What do they do instead?  Why didn’t anyone wake up?
     
  4. When he is a safe distance away from Saul and his army, who does David call out to?  What message does David deliver?  What is David’s proof that Saul’s guard did not do its job? 
        
  5. Who calls out to David?  What is David’s response?  How does Saul respond to David’s words?  Under what terms do David and Saul part ways at this time?

               

The Application:

  1. How often do you return to something that hasn’t worked out the way you want?  Do you tend to follow directions even if initially it doesn’t look like it will get you what you want? 
        
  2. Do you tend to take things at face value or are you more likely to investigate?  How hard is it for you to head in a direction that doesn’t appear to make sense or be safe?  What does it take for you to do that?     
     
  3. If you were asked to accompany someone into a dangerous situation would you do it?  How hard is it to remain consistent in doing the right thing — particularly in regards to people who aren’t doing right and there wrong may be directed at you?  
           
  4. When people are against you, are there good ways that you can get their attention?  When things, or people, seem to be against you do you often consider God could be behind it?  Could He?  Why or why not?  
     
  5. How hard is it to admit your actions have not been appropriate?  Is it harder to admit or to change bad actions?

                

Next week: 1 Samuel 27:1-12
Hiding In Plain Sight