2 Samuel: Lesson 16 — Is That Really So?

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 2 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

A Man After God’s Own Heart:
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

A Study of the Book of 2 Samuel

Lesson 16 (Is That Really So?)
2 Samuel 16
January 9, 2013

The Text:

  1. As David fled Jerusalem, who came to meet him?  What did he bring?  What did he say they were for?
  2. What question does David have for Ziba?  What response does he give?  How does David respond?
  3. Who else comes to meet David?  What does he do?  Why?  What does Abishai want to do about it?
  4. How does David respond to Abishai?  How does David compare what is happening with what his son is doing?  What was David’s hope?
  5. Who comes to see Absalom?  How does Absalom respond to him?  What is his reply/reasoning back to Absalom?  What advice does Ahithophel give Absalom?  Why?

The Application:

  1. What do you think of the old phrase, “never look a gift  horse in the mouth”?  Is that good advice?  Why/Why not?
  2. Do you question things that don’t make sense?  Is it easy to believe things that seem to make sense?  Have you ever made a bad decision/judgment based on information that sounded right, but really wasn’t?
  3. Have you ever been spoken badly about because of your past or because of who formerly did what you are doing?  Have you ever spoken badly about someone because of their past or your relationship with a person they “took over” for?  How do you react to criticism?
  4. How tempting is it to involve others in dealing with criticism directed at you that they are not really a part of?  How often do you look for elements of truth in criticism?  What makes it easy/hard to do so?
  5. Do you often “change sides” with issues or people?  How confident are you of people who seem to often “change sides”?  Who does your loyalty belong to?  How likely are you to follow bad advice if it appears it will serve to offend your enemy?  What if that advice came from someone who everyone believed had a direct connection with God?

Next Week: Conflicting Advice
2 Samuel 17

2 Samuel: Lesson 15 — I Can Be King!

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 2 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

A Man After God’s Own Heart:
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

A Study of the Book of 2 Samuel

Lesson 15 (I Can Be King!)
2 Samuel 15
December 19, 2012

The Text:

  1. What is it that Absalom did with his renewed favor with the king?  Where would he start his day?  Who would typically be coming into town?  How would Absalom greet them?  What did he say about the chances of them being heard by the king?
  2. After planting in the people’s mind that there was no one to listen to them, what does Absalom suggest?  How would he treat those who wanted to show him respect?  What effect did this have on the people of Israel?
  3. How long did Absalom act in this manner?  What request did he have of David?  What did he state he wanted to do?  What did he do instead?
  4. What message was brought to David?  How did  he respond?  Who went with him?  Who were the Gittites?  What did David suggest they do?  What did they do instead?
  5. What reaction did the people have as David and those with him passed by?  What did David have done with the ark of God after they had left the city?  What was David’s prayer concerning the counsel Absalom would receive?  Who was Hushai and what did David have him do?

The Application:

  1. Is enough ever enough?  What makes it easier/more difficult to be satisfied?  Has anyone ever tried to discredit you to make themselves appear better or more appealing?  Have you tried that?  How should you respond when people do that?
  2. Do you ever act like you have all the answers or could solve all problems if given the opportunity?  Why is flattery so deceitful yet so effective?
  3. Do you ever make a request in a way that you know will be received positively when you really have a different purpose and motive behind the request than what you let on?  Why is manipulation so damaging?
  4. How hard is it to flee a situation even when you know the consequences of staying will be harmful to you and others?  Are there people who would stand with you no matter what?  Are there people you would stand with no matter what?  Why?
  5. How hard is it to do what needs done when doing so causes sadness in others?  How hard is it to leave the “making right” in God’s hands?  Are there ways He wants you involved?

Next Week: Is That Really So?
2 Samuel 16

2 Samuel: Lesson 14 — Coming Home

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 2 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

A Man After God’s Own Heart:
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

A Study of the Book of 2 Samuel

Lesson 14 (Coming Home)
2 Samuel 14
December 12, 2012

The Text:

  1. What did Joab know about the king?  Who did Joab enlist to help him?  What story did Joab give to be told to the king?  How does David respond to the story?
  2. After David responds to the story, who is he told the story is really about?  What question does David have for the one telling the story?  What answer is he given?
  3. Who does David give instructions to regarding Absalom?  How does that person respond?  What does it seem to say about where he was for all of this?
  4. Where does Absalom go when Joab brings him back to Jerusalem?  What were David’s instructions regarding this?  What was the reputation Absalom gained throughout Israel?
  5. How much time passed with Absalom not seeing the king?  Why did Absalom send for Joab?  What did Absalom do after Joab refused for a second time to come to him?  What was his reasoning?  What came of it?

The Application:

  1. Have you ever found yourself in a situation that you wanted to be different but had reached a point that you didn’t know how to change the circumstances?  Why is it important to involve wise people when dealing with conflict?  How are you able to help people see necessary changes without them feeling a need to be defensive?
  2. How do stories help you see things in a bigger perspective than what otherwise might be noticed?  How do you feel when confronted about something and you realize that someone else is behind it all?  Should it matter?
  3. How hard is it to stay in the background when others are needed to speak on your behalf?  How gracious are you when your requests are received well?
  4. How difficult is it to fully put the past behind you?  Are there times when it is easier to keep a distance from the people of past situations to avoid the reminders?
  5. Do you ever get tired of waiting?  How often do you avoid people because you know they will ask you do to something that you know someone else doesn’t want done?  To what extremes would you go to be heard?  Is partial reconciliation better than no reconciliation?

Next Week: I Can Be King!
2 Samuel 15

2 Samuel: Lesson 13 — Two Wrongs . . . Are Still Wrong

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 2 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

A Man After God’s Own Heart:
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

A Study of the Book of 2 Samuel

Lesson 13 (Two Wrongs . . . Are Still Wrong)
2 Samuel 13
December 5, 2012

The Text:

  1. Who was Amnon?  What was his feelings toward Tamar?  Who was Tamar?  How is Jonadab described?  What did he notice about Amnon?  What did he recommend doing?  Who came to visit Amnon?  Why?  What did Amnon request?  What did he do when the request was granted?
  2.  How did Tamar respond to what Amnon was trying to do?  What reasoning did she try to use to prevent Amnon’s actions?  What alternative did she give?  How did Amnon feel after he had his way?  What was Tamar’s response to this?
  3. What was Absalom’s response to Tamar when he discovered what happened?  Where did Tamar end up living?  What was David’s reaction when he found out what had happened?  What was Absalom’s immediate response to Amnon?
  4. When Absalom’s sheepshearers had gathered, what request did he have of David?  How did David respond?  Who was he really wanting?  How much time had passed from the incident earlier in the chapter?
  5. What did Absalom have his men do?  What did the rest of David’s sons do after this happened?  What was the first report that got back to David?  Who corrected that report?  What was the reason given?  What did Absalom do?  What did David do?

The Application:

  1. Have you ever wanted something you knew was wrong?  What are the dangers of dwelling on something unobtainable?  How can you avoid being a part of someone’s deceitful plan?
  2. When you’re in the midst of wrong about to happen, are you more concerned about how it will make you look or how it will make the perpetrator look?  What does it take to consider less harmful alternatives when surrounded by evil?
  3. How do you respond when evil is done to people you love?  What role should justice play in forgiveness?  What dangers exist of not dealing with transgression immediately?
  4. Does time really heal all wounds?  Why would you request something that wasn’t really what you wanted?  Why is manipulation such a bad thing?
  5. Is it tempting to not get involved when you know a person “deserves” what they are getting?  Can you really ever make things right by doing wrong?  What can be the consequences?

Next Week: Coming Home
2 Samuel 14

2 Samuel: Lesson 12 — You’re The Man!

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 2 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

A Man After God’s Own Heart:
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

A Study of the Book of 2 Samuel

Lesson 12 (You’re The Man!)
2 Samuel 12
November 28, 2012

The Text:

  1. Who is Nathan?  What story does Nathan tell David?  What is David’s response?
  2. What is Nathan’s response to David’s reaction?  What had God given David?  What was God’s view of what David had done?  What consequences did God say David would face?
  3. How did David respond when confronted with being the subject of the story that angered him and with the consequences for his actions?  What was God’s response to this?  What had David’s actions done beyond the nation of Israel?
  4. What did God say would happen to the son born to David and Bathsheba?  What did David do about this?  Why were the servants afraid to tell David when the child died?  What was David’s response when he found out?  How does God respond to the next son of David and Bathsheba?
  5. What had Joab been doing?  What message does he send to David?  What does David do?  How successful is he?

The Application:

  1. Who are some messengers of God that you know?  Do you see yourself as one?  Do stories of injustice anger you?  Why is it easier to see injustice around us rather than the injustice from within?
  2. When a story impacts your emotions, does God ever say to you, “it’s about you!”?  What has God given you?  In light of that, how do you think God feels about any selfishness you have?  Why do you think selfishness, envy, greed, and covetousness are so damaging?
  3. How do you respond when convicted of sin?  Does this take away the consequences of the sin?  What are some purposes of God bringing about consequences to sinful actions?
  4. Have you ever pleaded seriously with God about something that you wanted Him to change His mind about or change the outcome?  How hard is it to be at peace when the situation is over and the outcome didn’t change like you wanted?  Are you confident of God’s love after receiving His discipline?
  5. How hard is it to stay faithful in what you are called to do when those around you aren’t’?  How likely are you to hand off honor when the opportunity exists to take if for yourself?  Do you learn from God’s discipline and do the right thing at the next opportunity?

Next Week: Two Wrongs . . . Are Still Wrong
2 Samuel 13

2 Samuel: Lesson 11 — Out Of Order

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 2 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

A Man After God’s Own Heart:
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

A Study of the Book of 2 Samuel

Lesson 11 (Out Of Order)
2 Samuel 11
November 14, 2012

The Text:

  1. What was the usual custom of nations in the spring of the year?  What does David do?  
      
  2. What does David do on an evening he can’t sleep?  What does he notice?  What does he have done?  What information does he find out?  What does he do about that information?  What happens?
      
  3. What message does Bathsheba send to David?  Who does David send for?  What instructions was he given?  What did he do?  What is David told?  What reason is given by Uriah for his actions?  How did David respond?  Did his plan work?
      
  4. Who does David write to?  What did he write?  Who did he send the letter with?  What happens?  What seems to be Joab’s concern in sending a message back to David regarding the battle?
      
  5. What report is given to David?  What message did David send back?  Why?  What did Bathsheba do about what had happened to Uriah?  What does David do?  How did God feel?

   

 The Application:

  1. What are some expectations, or customs, associated with who you are, what you do, etc.?  Are these good, bad, or some combination of both?  Do you ever not do them, or feel like not doing them?  Why?
      
  2. What do you do when you find yourself with time and nothing you need to do?  Are there things you notice that maybe you shouldn’t?  How do you handle that?  At what point does it become a problem?  How hard is it to stop once you’ve begun a process in the wrong direction? 
      
  3. Do you like the feeling of getting special treatment?  Have you ever been singled out in a good way and not know why?  How much concern do you have for your brothers and sisters who live with less comfort than you do?
      
  4. Have you ever delivered a message and not know what was in it?  What does it take to do such a thing?  Have you ever followed instructions only to have something turn out poorly?  How did you feel? 
      
  5. How do you feel when a bad plan of yours succeeds?  How do you feel when it appears your sin may be noticed by others?  How does God feel?

Next Week: You’re The Man
2 Samuel 12

2 Samuel: Lesson 10 — Extending Kindness

The following are discussion questions from a weekly study I am leading through the book of 2 Samuel.  We meet each Wednesday evening at the Deer Run Church of Christ.

A Man After God’s Own Heart:
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

A Study of the Book of 2 Samuel

Lesson 10 (Extending Kindness)
2 Samuel 9 & 10
November 7, 2012

The Text:

  1. Who does David look for?  What is his purpose?  Who was Ziba?  What information does he share with David?  What does David to with this information?  
     
  2. What does Mephibosheth do when he meets David?  How does David respond?  Why would David respond in such a way?  How does Mephibosheth view himself?
     
  3. What instruction does David give Ziba?  What was the purpose?  How does Ziba respond to David?  What honor is given to Mephibosheth?
     
  4. What does David intend to do when he hears of the death of the king of the Ammonites?  What do the Ammonite nobles convince the new king of about David’s intent?  What does Hanun do with David’s delegation?  How does David respond?
     
  5. What did the Ammonites do when they realized how offensive they had become to Israel?  What was Joab’s strategy?  What did he plan to do?  What did he expect God to do?  What happened in the battle? 

  

The Application:

  1. Is there anyone from your past that God would have you show kindness to?  What efforts could you, would you, take to find such a person?  Are there people you should extend kindness to for the sake of a friendship you had with someone else?
     
  2. How does it feel to be called in to see someone and not know why?  Are there people who would feel threatened in your presence?  How can you reassure someone that you are not a threat to them?  How hard is it to have a proper view of yourself? 
     
  3. What role do you have in caring for people?  How does that compare to what you believe God might want it to be?  What things make serving others difficult?
     
  4. How often do you show kindness, or extend sympathy, to someone because you believe it is the right thing to do — not necessarily because you want to?  Are your expressions of kindness ever misunderstood?  What role do others have in that misunderstanding? 
     
  5. When you’ve done something to offend someone, how do you typically respond when you realize it?  What are the disadvantages to defending your actions when your actions weren’t honorable to begin with?  What should be done instead?

  

Next Week: Out Of Order
2 Samuel 11